The Hyalella (Crustacea: Amphipoda) species cloud of the ancient Lake Titicaca originated from multiple colonizations

Sarah J. Adamowicz, María Cristina Marinone, Silvina Menu-Marque, Jeffrey W. Martin, Daniel C. Allen, Michelle N. Pyle, Patricio De los Ríos, Crystal N. Sobel, Carla Ibañez, Julio Pinto, Jonathan D.S. Witt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ancient lakes are renowned for their exceptional diversity of endemic species. As model systems for the study of sympatric speciation, it is necessary to understand whether a given hypothesized species flock is of monophyletic or polyphyletic origin. Here, we present the first molecular characterization of the Hyalella (Crustacea: Amphipoda) species complex of Lake Titicaca, using COI and 28S DNA sequences, including samples from the connected Small and Large Lakes that comprise Lake Titicaca as well as from a broader survey of southern South American sites. At least five evolutionarily distant lineages are present within Lake Titicaca, which were estimated to have diverged from one another 12–20 MYA. These major lineages are dispersed throughout the broader South American Hyalella phylogeny, with each lineage representing at least one independent colonization of the lake. Moreover, complex genetic relationships are revealed between Lake Titicaca individuals and those from surrounding water bodies, which may be explained by repeated dispersal into and out of the lake, combined with parallel intralacustrine diversification within two separate clades. Although further work in deeper waters will be required to determine the number of species present and modes of diversification, our results strongly indicate that this amphipod species cloud is polyphyletic with a complex geographic history.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)232-242
Number of pages11
JournalMolecular Phylogenetics and Evolution
Volume125
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We are very grateful to Agustín Bachmann, Paul Hebert, Santiago Echaniz, Alicia Vignatti, Juan Paggi, Alfonso Giudici, Eliana Ibáñez, Elizabeth Escalante, the Family Escalante-Astudillo, Elisa Pistán, Cinthia Ramos, Claudia Zepita, Veronika Sacherová, and Bohumír Janský for providing specimens, assisting with field collecting, and/or assisting with field logistics. Angela Holliss of the Advanced Analysis Centre at the University of Guelph conducted the DNA sequencing. We thank Austin Duong for assistance with proof-reading and referencing and Tzitziki Loeza-Quintana for valuable input on the Bayesian analyses. We also thank two anonymous reviewers for their thoughtful and constructive comments. This research was supported by a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) Discovery Grant ( 2012-327509 ) to JDSW, an NSERC postdoctoral fellowship and NSERC Discovery Grant ( 386591-2010 ) to SJA, NSERC Undergraduate Student Research Awards (USRA) to DCA and JWM, and a grant to PR from the Research Direction of the Catholic University of Temuco (funding for development of Limnology Project DGI-DCA 2007-01, Project MECESUP UCT 0804, with valuable support from MI).

Funding Information:
We are very grateful to Agustín Bachmann, Paul Hebert, Santiago Echaniz, Alicia Vignatti, Juan Paggi, Alfonso Giudici, Eliana Ibáñez, Elizabeth Escalante, the Family Escalante-Astudillo, Elisa Pistán, Cinthia Ramos, Claudia Zepita, Veronika Sacherová and Bohumír Janský for providing specimens, assisting with field collecting, and/or assisting with field logistics. Angela Holliss of the Advanced Analysis Centre at the University of Guelph conducted the DNA sequencing. We thank Austin Duong for assistance with proof-reading and referencing and Tzitziki Loeza-Quintana for valuable input on the Bayesian analyses. We also thank two anonymous reviewers for their thoughtful and constructive comments. This research was supported by a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) Discovery Grant (2012-327509) to JDSW, an NSERC postdoctoral fellowship and NSERC Discovery Grant (386591-2010) to SJA, NSERC Undergraduate Student Research Awards (USRA) to DCA and JWM, and a grant to PR from the Research Direction of the Catholic University of Temuco (funding for development of Limnology Project DGI-DCA 2007-01, Project MECESUP UCT 0804, with valuable support from MI).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 Elsevier Inc.

Keywords

  • Ancient lakes
  • Evolutionary radiation
  • Lake Titicaca
  • Species flocks
  • Sympatric speciation

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