Phylogeographic variation within the Buff-browed Foliage-gleaner (Aves: Furnariidae: Syndactyla rufosuperciliata) supports an Andean-Atlantic forests connection via the Cerrado

Gustavo S. Cabanne, Leonardo Campagna, Natalia Trujillo-Arias, Kazuya Naoki, Isabel Gómez, Cristina Y. Miyaki, Fabricio R. Santos, Giselle P.M. Dantas, Alexandre Aleixo, Santiago Claramunt, Amanda Rocha, Renato Caparroz, Irby J. Lovette, Pablo L. Tubaro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

We evaluated whether the Andean and the Atlantic forests acted as refugia during the Quaternary, and tested biogeographic hypotheses about the regions involved in the connectivity between those biomes (through the Chaco or the Cerrado). To achieve these goals we selected the Buff-browed Foliage-gleaner Syndactyla rufosuperciliata (Aves, Furnariidae) as a study system, a taxon distributed between the Andean and Atlantic forest. We first explored the historical connectivity between regions through niche modeling. We subsequently used DNA sequences (n = 71 individuals) and genomic analyses (ddRADseq, n = 33 individuals) to evaluate population genetic structure and gene flow within this species. Finally, we performed population model selection using Approximate Bayesian Computation. Our findings indicate that the Andean and the Atlantic forests acted as refugia, and that the populations of the focal species from both regions contacted through the Cerrado region, thus suggesting that the historical dynamics of Andean and Atlantic forests are important for the evolution of forest birds in the region. The results are in agreement with studies of other organisms and may indicate a more general pattern of connectivity among biomes in the Neotropics. Finally, we recommend recognizing both the Andean and the Altantic forests lineages of S. rufosuperciliata as independent species.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)198-213
Number of pages16
JournalMolecular Phylogenetics and Evolution
Volume133
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank the staff of the institutions that loaned tissue samples used in this study: Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales Bernardino Rivadavia (Argentina), Instituto de Biociências da Universidad de São Paulo (Brazil); Louisiana Museum of Natural History (USA), Field Museum of Natural History (USA), Biodiversity Institute and Natural History Museum (Kansas University, USA), Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi (Brazil) and Centro de Coleções Taxonômicas of the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (Brazil). We thank the following institutions for granting collection permits: Administración de Parques Nacionales (Argentina), Ministerio de Ecología de Misiones, and environmental authorities of Bolivia and Brazil. This study was funded by: the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Tecnológicas ( PIP 2011 276 , PIP 2015 637 , Coop. Int. CNPq-CONICET, as well as Fondo IBOL Argentina), the Agencia Nacional de Promoción Científica y Tecnológica from Argentina (Coop. Int. CAPES-MINCyT, PICT 2012 1924 and PICT 2014 2154 ), and Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (BIOTA, 2013/50297-0) from Brazil, and by the American Museum of Natural History through a Chapman Postdoctoral Fellowship to SC. AA was supported by CNPq research productivity fellowships ( ##308927/2016-8 ).

Funding Information:
We thank the staff of the institutions that loaned tissue samples used in this study: Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales Bernardino Rivadavia (Argentina), Instituto de Biociências da Universidad de São Paulo (Brazil); Louisiana Museum of Natural History (USA), Field Museum of Natural History (USA), Biodiversity Institute and Natural History Museum (Kansas University, USA), Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi (Brazil) and Centro de Coleções Taxonômicas of the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (Brazil). We thank the following institutions for granting collection permits: Administración de Parques Nacionales (Argentina), Ministerio de Ecología de Misiones, and environmental authorities of Bolivia and Brazil. This study was funded by: the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Tecnológicas (PIP 2011 276, PIP 2015 637, Coop. Int. CNPq-CONICET, as well as Fondo IBOL Argentina), the Agencia Nacional de Promoción Científica y Tecnológica from Argentina (Coop. Int. CAPES-MINCyT, PICT 2012 1924 and PICT 2014 2154), and Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (BIOTA, 2013/50297-0) from Brazil, and by the American Museum of Natural History through a Chapman Postdoctoral Fellowship to SC. AA was supported by CNPq research productivity fellowships (##308927/2016-8).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 Elsevier Inc.

Keywords

  • Andean tropical forests
  • Approximate Bayesian Computation
  • Atlantic Forest
  • Birds
  • ddRADseq
  • Population genomics

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