Landscape evolution and human agency: Archaeological case studies from drylands in western south america and australia

Gregory Zaro, Heather Builth, Claudia Rivera, Jimena Roldán, Graciela Suvires

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Landscapes represent a dynamic point of articulation between humans and the environment. While often dichotomized, humans are active participants in the environment and often play a pivotal role in its transformation over time. In this paper, we use case studies from western South America and Australia to illustrate the importance of studying long-term dynamics between humans and the environment. Such investigations can bring significant historical depth to environmental change and the role humans have played in altering courses of landscape evolution and species biodiversity. Humans comprise a critical element in environmental change, and collectively, our results hold strong implications for issues related to sustainability and effective management of our planet's desert resources.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)261-271
Number of pages11
JournalChungara
Volume40
Issue numberESPECIAL
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

Keywords

  • Agriculture
  • Australia
  • Dryland environments
  • South america
  • Sustainability

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Landscape evolution and human agency: Archaeological case studies from drylands in western south america and australia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this