Inventory of glacier-front positions using CBERS-2 data: A case study for the Bolivian Andes

Rafael R. Ribeiro, Jefferson C. Simões, Jorge Arigony-Neto, Edson Ramírez Rodriguez

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

For the first time, products of the China-Brazil Earth Resources Satellite (CBERS) are used for Andean glaciers studies. In this paper we compare results from previous ground studies with our observations using two scenes acquired by the High Resolution Charge Coupled Device (CCD) and the Infra-Red Multispectral Scanner (IRMSS) aboard the second Chinese-Brazilian satellite (CBERS-2), to establish an inventory of glacier frontal positions from 1975 to 2004 in the Cordillera Tres Cruces, Central Bolivia. All studied glaciers have retreated since 1974 (by up to 409 m) agreeing with ground studies. The use of CBERS-2 can contribute to establish an inventory of Andean glaciers as it covers the same area each 26 days.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationGlacier Mass Balance Changes and Meltwater Discharge
Pages135-142
Number of pages8
Edition318
StatePublished - 2007
Event7th Scientific Assembly of the International Association of Hydrological Science, IAHS - Workshop on Andean Glaciology and Symposium on the Contribution from Glaciers and Snow Cover to Runoff from Mountains in Different Climates - Foz do Iguacu, Brazil
Duration: 4 Apr 20059 Apr 2005

Publication series

NameIAHS-AISH Publication
Number318
ISSN (Print)0144-7815

Conference

Conference7th Scientific Assembly of the International Association of Hydrological Science, IAHS - Workshop on Andean Glaciology and Symposium on the Contribution from Glaciers and Snow Cover to Runoff from Mountains in Different Climates
Country/TerritoryBrazil
CityFoz do Iguacu
Period4/04/059/04/05

Keywords

  • CBERS-2
  • Glacier inventory
  • Remote sensing

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