Genetic differentiation and diversity of the Bolivian endemic titi monkeys, Plecturocebus modestus and Plecturocebus olallae

Julia Barreta Pinto, Jesús Martinez, Yahaira Bernal, Rolando Sánchez, Robert Wallace

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The genetic variability of New World primates is still poorly documented. We present the first genetic study on two threatened endemic titi monkey species in northern Bolivia (Plecturocebus modestus and Plecturocebus olallae) using six microsatellite markers to investigate genetic structure and variability of 54 individuals from two wild populations. A low level of genetic diversity was found (34 alleles in the total sampled population). Locus 1118 presented the greatest number of alleles. The mean number of alleles per locus in the total population was 5.6 and the average heterozygosity was 0.38 (range 0.12–0.88). The FIS value for the total population using all microsatellite loci shows a statistically significant heterozygote deficit. The inbreeding coefficients (FIS) were positive and significantly different from zero (0.064 for P. olallae and 0.213 for P. modestus). The genetic differentiation between populations (FST) was moderate with a pair-wise FST estimate of 0.14. Population structure analyses assigned the two populations to two differentiated clusters (K = 2). These results suggest that these two species with very close distributional ranges arose from a single population, and that they remain in a process of genetic differentiation and speciation. This study further underlines the urgent need for conservation actions for both endemic primate species.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)565-573
Number of pages9
JournalPrimates
Volume60
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank the Wildlife Conservation Society, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Primate Conservation Inc., Margot Marsh Biodiversity Foundation, BP Conservation Leadership Program, and Conservation International Primate Action Fund for financial support for conservation research efforts on the Bolivian Plecturocebus endemics. We thank our field assistant Hector Cáceres, and also Lesly Lopez who helped in data collection. We thank the National Directorate for the Protection of Biodiversity for help in acquiring necessary research permits, as well as the collaboration of the Municipalities of Reyes, San Borja, and Santa Rosa del Yacuma, and the Nogales cattle ranches for access to the study sites. We acknowledge the support of the Institute of Biology Molecular and Biotechnology (Universidad Mayor de San Andres) in La Paz.

Funding Information:
We thank the Wildlife Conservation Society, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Primate Conservation Inc., Margot Marsh Biodiversity Foundation, BP Conservation Leadership Program, and Conservation International Primate Action Fund for financial support for conservation research efforts on the Bolivian Plecturocebus endemics. We thank our field assistant Hector Cáceres, and also Lesly Lopez who helped in data collection. We thank the National Directorate for the Protection of Biodiversity for help in acquiring necessary research permits, as well as the collaboration of the Municipalities of Reyes, San Borja, and Santa Rosa del Yacuma, and the Nogales cattle ranches for access to the study sites. We acknowledge the support of the Institute of Biology Molecular and Biotechnology (Universidad Mayor de San Andres) in La Paz.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019, Japan Monkey Centre and Springer Japan KK, part of Springer Nature.

Keywords

  • Beni titi monkey
  • Conservation
  • Genetic diversity
  • Microsatellites
  • Olalla brothers monkey

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