Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto, Echinococcus ortleppi; and E. intermedius (G7) are present in Bolivia

V. Ali, E. Martinez, P. Duran, M. A. Seláez, M. Barragan, P. Nogales, A. Peña Y Lillo, M. Castañares, Y. Claros, P. Deplazes, C. A. Alvarez Rojas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a zoonotic disease caused by a complex of species known as Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato. CE is endemic in Argentina, Chile, Peru, Uruguay and the South part of Brazil. In contrast, little is known regarding the presence of CE in Bolivia. In this study, 35 cysts isolated from livestock (mostly from the Department of La Paz) and 3 from humans (La Paz, Oruro and Potosi) were genetically characterized analysing the sequence of the cox1 gene (1609 bp). In total, 30 cysts (from La Paz, Cochabamba and Beni) were characterized as E. granulosus sensu stricto (3 fertile and 4 non-fertile cysts from sheep, 8 fertile and 12 non-fertile cysts from cattle and 3 fertile cysts from humans). A detailed analysis of the cox1 haplotypes of E. granulosus s.s. is included. Echinococcus ortleppi (G5) was found in 5 fertile cysts from cattle (from La Paz and Cochabamba). Echinococcus intermedius (G7) was identified in 3 fertile cysts from pigs (from Santa Cruz). Additionally, E. granulosus s.s. was detected in 4 dog faecal samples, while E. ortleppi was present in other two dog faecal samples. The implications of these preliminary results in the future implementation of control measures are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)949-956
Number of pages8
JournalParasitology
Volume147
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The project ‘Cystic echinococcosis in Bolivia’ is a joint research between the University of Zurich and the Universidad Mayor San Andres in Bolivia. A mobility grant of the Leading House of the Latin American Region ‘Epidemiological investigation of cystic echinococcosis in humans and animals in Bolivia’ is directly linked to this project and has been financed by the Leading House of the Latin American Region/State Secretariat for Education, Research and Innovation (SERI). We acknowledge the authorities of the Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Mayor de San Andrés, for administrative collaboration for this joint initiative; to the Arq Anna Hilda Portugal Peña and the staff of the Centro Municipal de Faeno, Gobierno Autónomo Municipal de La Paz, for their collaboration with collecting of samples from cattle; to Javier Larico and Ever Quispe, from the Servicio Nacional de Sanidad Agropecuaria e Inocuidad Alimentaria (SENASAG) at La Paz, for their collaboration with this project. Our gratefulness to Dr George Garcia for providing parasite material collected from a human. Special acknowledgements to the authorities and inhabitants of the Municipalities of Batallas, Pucarani and Tiahuanacu for their collaboration during the fieldwork.

Funding Information:
The analyses of the samples were financed by the Institute of Parasitology, University of Zurich. The sample collection, transportation and parasitological analysis were funded by IINSAD and the Research Laboratory of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Mayor de San Andrés. Cristian A. Alvarez Rojas is a recipient of the mobility grant funded by the Leading House of the Latin American Region/State Secretariat for Education, Research and Innovation (SERI).

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press.

Keywords

  • Bolivia
  • cystic echinococcosis
  • Echinococcus granulosus
  • genotypes
  • haplotypes
  • molecular epidemiology

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