CO2 in indoor environments: From environmental and health risk to potential renewable carbon source

L. R. López, P. Dessì, A. Cabrera-Codony, L. Rocha-Melogno, B. Kraakman, V. Naddeo, M. D. Balaguer, S. Puig

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the developed world, individuals spend most of their time indoors. Poor Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) has a wide range of effects on human health. The burden of disease associated with indoor air accounts for millions of premature deaths related to exposure to Indoor Air Pollutants (IAPs). Among them, CO2 is the most common one, and is commonly used as a metric of IAQ. Indoor CO2 concentrations can be significantly higher than outdoors due to human metabolism and activities. Even in presence of ventilation, controlling the CO2 concentration below the Indoor Air Guideline Values (IAGVs) is a challenge, and many indoor environments including schools, offices and transportation exceed the recommended value of 1000 ppmv. This is often accompanied by high concentration of other pollutants, including bio-effluents such as viruses, and the importance of mitigating the transmission of airborne diseases has been highlighted by the COVID-19 pandemic. On the other hand, the relatively high CO2 concentration of indoor environments presents a thermodynamic advantage for direct air capture (DAC) in comparison to atmospheric CO2 concentration. This review aims to describe the issues associated with poor IAQ, and to demonstrate the potential of indoor CO2 DAC to purify indoor air while generating a renewable carbon stream that can replace conventional carbon sources as a building block for chemical production, contributing to the circular economy.

Original languageEnglish
Article number159088
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume856
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Jan 2023
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreements No 101018274 (L.R. López) and No 101029266 (P. Dessì). A. Cabrera-Codony acknowledges Programa Juan de la Cierva-Incorporación ( IJC2020-045964-I ) and funding from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation ( PID2020-112615RA-100 ). S. Puig is a Serra Húnter Fellow ( UdG-AG-575 ) and acknowledges the funding from the ICREA Academia award, funding from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation ( PIFD2021-126240OB-100 ). LEQUIA has been recognized as consolidated research group by the Catalan Government ( 2017-SGR-1552 ).

Funding Information:
According to the Circular Economy Action plan guidelines developed by the European Commission, the transition from linear to circular economy must be driven by research, innovation and digitalization ( European Comission, 2020a ). The European Regional Development Fund, through its smart specialization, LIFE and Horizon Europe research programmes aim to complement private funding and support the whole innovation cycle. One of the aims of the Horizon Europe program within the Circular Economy Action plan is the development of novel materials and products, new production and recycling technologies, including exploring the potential of chemical recycling.

Funding Information:
This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreements No 101018274 (L.R. López) and No 101029266 (P. Dessì). A. Cabrera-Codony acknowledges Programa Juan de la Cierva-Incorporación (IJC2020-045964-I) and funding from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (PID2020-112615RA-100). S. Puig is a Serra Húnter Fellow (UdG-AG-575) and acknowledges the funding from the ICREA Academia award, funding from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (PIFD2021-126240OB-100). LEQUIA has been recognized as consolidated research group by the Catalan Government (2017-SGR-1552).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022

Keywords

  • Biofuels
  • CO capture
  • Climate change
  • Health risk
  • Indoor air quality
  • Microbial electrochemical technologies
  • Renewable energy

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